Making suexec work…

suexec is a useful way of getting apache to run interactive magic (cgi scripts, php scripts etc) with a different user/group than the one that apache is running as.

Most configuration guides tell you:

  • Add “SuexecUserGroup $OWNER $GROUP” to your apache config
  • Look in /var/log/httpd/suexec.log to see what’s going wrong

What they don’t tell you, is that suexec makes some assumptions about where to find things it will execute, and that you can’t guarantee that log location is consistent across distros (or even versions of the same distro). I’m setting this up on CentOS 7, so the examples below were produced in that environment.

You can get useful information about both of the above by running the following:

[myuser]$ sudo suexec -V
-D AP_DOC_ROOT="/var/www"
-D AP_GID_MIN=100
-D AP_HTTPD_USER="apache"
-D AP_LOG_SYSLOG
-D AP_SAFE_PATH="/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin"
-D AP_UID_MIN=500
-D AP_USERDIR_SUFFIX="public_html"
[myuser]$

AP_DOC_ROOT and AP_USERDIR_SUFFIX control which paths suexec will execute. In this case we’re restricted to running stuff that lives somewhere under “/var/www” or “/home/*/public_html”

If you’ve got content elsewhere (for example, an application which expects to be installed under /usr/share/foo/cgi-bin) then it’s not sufficient to put a symlink from /var/www/foo/cgi-bin to /usr/share/foo/cgi-bin as suexec checks the actual location of the file, not where it was called from.

This is sensible, as it stops you putting a symlink in place which points at something nasty like /bin/sh.

AP_GID_MIN and AP_UID_MIN limit which users/groups suexec will run stuff as. In this case it won’t run anything with a GID < 100 or a UID < 500. This is sensible as it stops you running CGI scripts as privileged system users.

The GID limit is probably not an issue, but the UID limit might cause wrinkles if you look after one of the 18 UoB users who have a centrally allocated unix UID that is under 500 (because they’ve been here since before that was a problem)[1]

AP_LOG_SYSLOG is a flag that says "send all log messages to syslog" – which is fine, and arguably an improvement over writing to a specific log file. It doesn’t immediately tell you where those messages end up, but I eventually found them in /var/log/secure… which seems a sensible place for them to end up.

Once you’ve got all that sorted, you’ll need to make selinux happy. Thankfully, that’s dead easy and can be done by enabling the httpd_unified boolean. If you’re using the jfryman/selinux puppet module, it’s as easy as:


selinux::boolean { 'httpd_unified': }

I think that’s all the bumps I’ve hit on this road so far, but if I find any more I’ll update this article.

-Paul
[1] but then again, if you look after them (or one of the 84 users whose UID is under 1000) you’re probably already used to finding odd things that don’t work!

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About Paul Seward

Paul is a Linux sysadmin looking after the servers behind the ResNet and eduroam networks, and the main campus DNS infrastructure at the University of Bristol.

He’s been using unix of one flavour or another for more than 2 decades, and is still constantly surprised by useful commands he didn’t know existed.